Update on the teachers’ strike and civil mobilization – 14 May 2013

“They told me to wear the uniform”
A teacher protests in front of parliament on 13 May in Syntagma square
Picture by @MakisSinodinos

By @IrateGreek 

Greek secondary education teachers, together with various groups who joined them in solidarity, held a demonstration yesterday in front of parliament to protest the government’s decision to issue preemptively a civil mobilization order for 86,000 teachers in order to prevent a possible strike on the first day of the national university entry exams, as proposed by the Federation of Secondary Education Teachers (OLME). The Council of State, Greece’s highest administrative court, rejected yesterday a request by OLME for temporary suspension of the civil mobilization order, despite the dubious legality and constitutionality of back-to-work legislation issued before a formal decision to go on strike is officially approved by regional unions.

Teachers are the third professional group, after employees of the Athens metro and sailors, to be hit by a civil mobilization order since the current coalition government was elected to power. Trucking contractors and municipal workers’s strikes were also broken in this way in 2010 and 2011. Of a total of 11 civil mobilization orders issued in Greece since the fall of the Junta, 5 were issued in the framework of bailout austerity policies.

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6 May 2012 – 6 May 2013: one year from the Greek general elections of May 2012

By @galaxyarchis, translated from Greek by @anarresti, corrections by @IrateGreek

By Spyros Derveniotis
Translation: “Dirty immigrants, dying
where the Greeks eat!

Greece recently had two very important political anniversaries. More specifically, May 6th, 2013, marked three years since the adoption of the Memorandum which caused the greatest political rearrangements in the country’s recent history, and one year since the 2012 general elections, when those dramatic changes were first expressed through the ballot box. Greek society is living in a period where political time is condensed to such a degree, that the changes occurring every month and every week can hardly be conceived by its collective consciousness. Since the May 2012 elections, which did not lead to the formation of a new government but to repeat elections a month later, the country’s image and its political landscape kept changing at a rapid pace until today. In light of a greater tribute to the one year anniversary since last June’s elections, when today’s three-party coalition government came to power, we take a look at the facts and data which changed in this past year, starting from last May’s elections.

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#rbnews international show 23 March 2013: Greece and Cyprus, a tale of two crises

On 23 March 2013 on #rbnews international, we discussed how Greeks and Cypriot perceive each other and their countries in the context of the sudden, acute financial crisis that engulfed Cyprus since last week. Our guests (via Skype) were George Markides (@georgiemark) and George Iordanou (@iordanou) from Cyprus, Nick Malkoutzis (@NickMalkoutzis) from Greece, and Yiannis Mouzakis (@YiannisMouzakis), who is a little bit from both.

Special thanks to @pitsirikos, @CorinaVasilopoulou, @adiasistos, @madamitsa@giwrgoslouvaris@MariaCuchicheo@ZenonZindilis, @Kartesios, @atreyiou and @SovJohn whose tweets gave us food for thought for this show.

You can listen to the podcast, as usual, after the jump.

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#rbnews international show 17 November 2012

By @IrateGreekOn the #rbnews international show on 17 November 2012, our guest was Joanna Kakissis, journalist with National Public Radio and Time magazine. We discussed the commemoration of the 1973 Polytechnic University uprising, the delay in the disbursement of Greece’s latest tranche of bailout loans, and the independence (or not) of the Greek judiciary. You can follow Joanna on Twitter @joannakakissisIn tribute to the 1973 Polytechnic uprising but also to celebrate World Tolerance Day on 16 November, we played songs from “Our Great Circus”, an anti-Junta musical first performed in Athens in the summer of 1973. The promotion of World Tolerance Day is supported by the 1 Against Racism network.

You can listen to the podcast and download the weekly news bulletin in English after the jump.

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What happened in the morning of #7ngr in the Greek Parliament

(By @doleross, translated from Greek)
When discussions over the draft law on the new austerity measures (Memorandum III) started in the Greek Parliament this morning, Syriza and Independent Greeks questioned the compatibility of thedraft law with the Constitution. According to the rapporteurs of the two parties, paragraphs on salary and pension cuts were unconstitutional, and so was the way the draft law came to discussion in Parliament: that is the emergency procedure which limits discussion time to 10 hours, even though many members of the Parliament only received the final, very long text of the law, on the same morning.

Discussion of the bailout in Parliament on 11 February 2012

By @IrateGreek

The second bailout agreement between Greece and its international lenders was discussed in the Financial Affairs Committee of parliament on 11 February, one day before it was voted upon in the plenary session of parliament. Below is the intervention of E.Panaritis, MP for the governing party PASOK, during the discussion. Mrs Panaritis voted in favour of all provisions of the bill.

Note: If subtitles do not appear automatically, please go to YouTube view and click on the CC button at the bottom right of the video.